ROOTS

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You’ve planted your roots under the humid sun,

pushing the earthen ground of filial obedience,

to find the water of appreciation and peace,

seeking the nutrients of innate contentment.

 

But you have been uprooted too often,

that your body is torn and bloodied, 

with the sins of your past,

with the karmas of your future.

 

You realise you only have the strength,

to gain stability in the concrete homes,

of those that never had the heart,

to give you loyalty in the first place.

 

Shiver at the ironic natures of this world!

 

The roots that you buried,

have been left to wither and die,

under the humid sun and the breezy winds,

the memories; the laugher.

 

Your living soul Is nothing but a distant past of a life once lived and mourned.

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TO ALL THE BOYS I’VE LOVED BEFORE:MOVIE REVIEW

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To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before is an enchanting romantic comedy that pays homage to the classic 90’s teen movie spirit and it tinted with a millennial touch for 21st century viewers.With a 96% rating on Rotten Tomatoes and with star studded performances, it is no surprise that Netflix’s highest rated teen comedy is an eye candy for all to enjoy, any day and time of the week.The film is an adaptation of New York Time’s bestseller novel of the same name, by author Jenny Han who decreed that Lara Jean’s role was to be played by an Asian-American.Director Susan Johnson uses some of that “old love magic” with its usual heart-melting archetypes and executes it with an aura of unabashed  sweetness and affection, which explains the huge cult fanbase.

The film revolves around Lara Jean (Lana Candor), a Korean-American 16 year old with an addition to romance novels and who chooses to hide her feelings of love in letters to her crushes.Her sense of quirkiness and comic despair is displayed effectively when circumstances “forces” her to date Peter Kavinsky( Noh Centineo), the most popular boy in school. Evantually through their bonding over respective missing parents and pop culture, an inevitable romance develops which makes watchers feel comfortable and sparky at the same time.

Overall, this film is a refuge from real-world love and provides a candy-tinted alternative in a way that is surprisingly fresh and lovable.To immerse yourself in such a film is to be profoundly pure of heart and immerse yourself in the warmth of utopic millennial love. 

Rating: 4/5